The Best Way To Take Care Of Rodent

THE BEST WAYS TO HELP GET RID OF MICE

Cats vs Mice.

Many cats love to hunt mice. Some dogs will even get in on the fun. If you have pets, they might be the best way to catch a mouse without lifting a finger. If you don’t have pets, now may be a good time to stop watching cat videos online and own one in real life. Many farms use farm or barn cats to control their mouse population. Of course, some pets just can’t be bothered with mice – not surprisingly with the way many people pamper their fur babies.

Tackle the mice in the house and out.

Remove debris around your home where mice can hide. Keep weeds to a minimum and destroy burrows and nesting areas as you find them. Lining your home’s foundation with a strip of heavy gravel is a good way to prevent nesting and burrowing. The less debris and clutter around your home and property, the easier it is to spot signs of rodent activity and stop mice dead in their tracks.

ood sanitation won’t get rid of mice, but poor sanitation will attract them.

Mice can survive on just 3 to 4 grams of food per day, so a few crumbs here and there are all they really need. Vacuum your floors and be sure to wipe down counters, eliminating residue, crumbs and any access to food sources. Store food in glass jars or airtight containers. Don’t forget about securing your garbage. Mice have sharp incisor teeth so they can chew through just about anything, even concrete if the mood strikes them, so plastic bags are no match for hungry rodents.

Bait stations.

Bait stations (or bait packages) are sealed packets containing meal or pellets. They typically come in plastic, paper or cellophane wrapping, allowing the mice to easily gnaw through and get at the preserved, fresh bait. The mice feed on this bait and die. While helpful in getting rid of mice, these products are best handled by trained pest management professionals to ensure the safety of you, your children and your pets.

Proper placement of mouse traps is critical.

Place the traps perpendicular to the walls, with the trigger section facing the baseboard. This causes the mouse to run directly into the bait as it naturally scurries along the walls, instead of running over the trap from the wrong direction, triggering it prematurely. Mice don’t travel more than 10 or 20 feet from food sources and nesting areas (i.e., their territory), so place the traps anywhere you see mice or signs of mice, such as rodent droppings or “rubbings” on baseboards and walls. Change trap locations every two days or so. Mice are naturally curious so they won’t avoid traps like rats will.

 

Easy Tips to Prevent Mice and Rodents Inside the Home

Simple Rodent Control Tips

Fortunately, there are many ways homeowners can proactively prevent and get rid of rodent infestations in their homes:

  • Install door sweeps on exterior doors and repair damaged screens.
  • Screen vents and openings to chimneys.
  • Seal cracks and holes on the outside of the home, including areas where utilities and pipes enter the home, using caulk, steel wool or a combination of both.
  • Store food in airtight containers and dispose of garbage regularly.
  • Keep attics, basements and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.
  • Replace loose mortar and weather stripping around the basement foundation and windows.
  • Eliminate all moisture sites, including leaking pipes and clogged drains that provide the perfect breeding site for pests.
  • Inspect items such as boxes, grocery bags and other packages brought into the home.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and keep shrubbery trimmed and cut back from the house.
  • If you suspect a pest infestation in your home, contact a licensed pest professional to inspect and treat the pest problem.

 

How to Get Rid of Rats in Your Home

How to Find the Rats

The first step in ridding your home of rats is finding where they are living. Because they are nocturnal (most active at night), rats aren’t often seen in the open during the day. But, it is easy to see signs of their presence.

Signs of rat presence include:

  • Live or dead rats
  • Droppings, especially around human or pet food or in or around trash areas
  • Noises in the dark, such as scratching sounds from the attic
  • Nests or piled nesting materials in hidden areas
  • Evidence of gnawing of wires or structural wood
  • Burrows around the yard or under the home or outbuildings
  • Gnawed fruits in trees
  • Smudge marks along walls or rodent hairs along paths, in nests, or near food

 

Rodent-Proofing Tips & Tricks for Your Home

Outdoor Sanitation

We have touched on this a bit already regarding landscaping and outside storage areas. If you store firewood it is best to keep it away from the house. It’s best to keep lumber and firewood about 18 inches off the ground. If you have debris like rock piles and old equipment laying around outside, make sure you have it removed. Make sure any outdoor garbage pails are shut tightly.

Indoor Sanitation

Keeping the home clean inside and out can prevent rodents from taking an interest in your home to begin with. Inside the home make sure you clean areas where food may collect or fall, like under the stove, dishwasher, and refrigerator. Make sure you keep countertops clean and clear of food and store any dry food, seeds, and pet food in airtight containers. If you do have pets, don’t leave food bowls down at night. Make sure you don’t leave cups or bowls of water out overnight as well. All of these things can attract rodents.

Landscaping

Many people love to have gorgeous bushes and dense plants around the yard. However, these also make a safe haven for rodents to take up residence right outside the home. While you don’t have to give up on creating the landscape you desire, try to use some moderation and keep the denser foliage away from the structure of the house. Trim tree branches back so you have at least a 6-foot gap between house and tree.

Clutter

We all have that one area or two where we allow clutter to take over. Usually this is in a basement, attic, or spare room. This also makes the perfect breeding ground for rodents. Keeping these areas as clutter-free as possible will go a long way in preventing a rodent outbreak.

Storage

Where and how you store food and seed is important in reducing the risk of a rodent infestation. If you store things like pet food, grass seed and birdseed outside of the house (in a shed for example), its best to have that storage at least 20 feet from the home and about 5 feet from the ground. Store food and seed in air tight, rodent-proof containers as well. Rodents are attracted by the smell of these things so it’s best to take precautions before they arrive rather than after the fact. Once a rodent has smelled food it will stick around looking for another source.

 

How to Get Rid of Mice in the House

Key facts about mice

Mice are mammals and rodents. Their closest relatives are jerboas, rats, mole rats, hamsters, chinchillas and guinea pigs.

The mouse is small, its body length varies from 1 to 8 inches (3 to 20 cm), and it weighs from 0,5 to 1,7 oz. (15 – 50 g). Mice are agile and fast animals, with a pointed muzzle, large rounded ears, and small protruding eyes. These rodents have good eyesight, they distinguish shades of red and yellow. The mouse body temperature ranges from 99.5° F – 102.2° F (37.5° C to 39° C). A distinctive feature of mice is their long bald tail.

How and where do mice live?

Mice can be found worldwide, except for extreme northern and high-mountainous areas. They live in large families, because this way it is easier to defend, build houses, grow offspring and find food. Rodents are fidgety and gluttonous animals. This helps them survive winter and cold seasons.